Ginger Chutney Or Allam Pachadi

Ginger chutney or allam pachadi.
A very aromatic and lip-smacking chutney. Ginger, tamarind, coconut, peanut, jaggery and chilli made this chutney tongue tickling.

This chutney is from Andhra cuisine. Allam means ginger. In authentic recipe coconut and peanut not usually used. But I love the nutty taste of dry roasted peanut and the sweetness and flavour of fresh coconut in chutney. So I have used both. You can use 1/2 to 1/4 teaspoon coriander seeds with chana dal, udad dal and cumin if you like the flavour. I didn’t.

You may like some more chutney recipes on this blog.
1. Mango sesame chutney

2. Raisin jaggery chutney with mango bar

3. Waterchestnut or singhara chutney

4. Onion tomato chutney or dip

5. Mango raisin chutney

6. Peanut chutney or dip

Sending this post to Facebook group Recipe Swap Challenge Initiated by Jolly
And Vidya.
We have to recreate a recipe from a fellow blogger’s blog.
This month my partner is Sandhya Ramakrishnan who blog at My Cooking Journey.
I love this ginger chutney on her blog. I have made little changes according to my taste.

Chutney is very easy to make. You can skip tempering at the end because chutney is also delicious without tempering. I have used coconut and peanut according to my taste. You can omit these if you want or if you don’t have these. I have used readymade tamarind paste but if you don’t have paste, soak 1 tablespoon tamarind in 1/4 cup warm water and strain the pulp when cool.

Recipe

Ginger – 1/4 cup, peeled and chopped in small pieces

Chana dal or Bengal gram – 1 tablespoon

Used dal or split black gram – 1 teaspoon

Fresh coconut – 2 tablespoon, chopped in small pieces, optional

Peanut – 2 tablespoon

Cumin seed – 1/2 teaspoon

Dry red chilli – 1 – 2 or to taste

Methi or fenugreek seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Jaggery powder – 1 tablespoon

Salt to taste

Tamarind paste – 2 tablespoon

Cumin powder – 1/2 teaspoon

Coriander powder – 1/4 teaspoon

Oil – 2 teaspoon

Water – 4 tablespoon

For tempering

Mustard seeds – 1/4 teaspoon

Curry leaves – 8 – 10

Oil – 1 teaspoon

Method

1. Dry roast the peanut. Let it cool down, peel and keep aside.

2. Heat 2 teaspoon oil in a pan.
Add chana dal, udad dal, dry red chilli, cumin seeds and methi or fenugreek seeds.

3. Fry until lentils become brown.
Add ginger pieces, coconut pieces and dry roasted and peeled peanut.

4. Mix and immediatly switch off the heat. Don’t fry the ginger too much, overcooking may be make the ginger bitter.

5. Let the mixture cool down completely.

6. Grind the mixture with tamarind paste, salt, cumin powder, coriander powder, jaggery and water. Don’t add too much water. Chutney should be thick consistency.

7. Take out the chutney in a bowl. Taste and adjust salt, jaggery and tamarind if required.

8. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a small pan.Add 1/4 teaspoon mustard seeds or rai and curry leaves. You can also add 1 dry red chilli. My chutney is already hot with 2 red chilli in the ground mixture so I didn’t.

8. When the seeds starts to splutter add the tempering in the chutney.
Serve with idli, dosa or serve as dip with any snack.

Notes

1. Use chilli according to your spice tolerance. If you want mildly spicy chutney, use only one red chilli.

2. Lemon juice or dry mango powder can be used instead of tamarind.

If you tried my recipe, you can share your food pictures with me in the social network sites by using hashtag, #batterupwithsujata
I would love to see your creations.

I would love to hear from you. Please share your thoughts and suggestions in comment.
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Karela Nu Shaak Or Gujarati Bitter Gourd Stir Fry

Karela nu shaak or bitter gourd stir fry from Gujarati cuisine.
A no onion garlic delicious stir fry without any bitterness.
If you don’t like the bitterness at all then you can peel the skin of karela before using. This way you will get a finger licking taste without any bitterness. I don’t like to reduce the nutrients so I didn’t.

Considered the most despicable vegetable of all, the karela is high in nutrients and provides numerous health benefits.
Bitter gourd, or karela in Hindi, is relished for its benefits and despised for its bitter taste.
It is an excellent source of vitamins B1, B2, and B3, C, magnesium, folate, zinc, phosphorus, manganese, and has high dietary fibre. It is rich in iron, and contains twice the beta-carotene of broccoli, twice the calcium of spinach, and twice the potassium of a banana, according to Health.com
Source

Monday again and this week’s 201 #Foodiemonday bloghop theme is #JamvaChaloJi. This week Mayuri Patel who blog at Mayuris Jikoni suggested the theme. Do visit her space for some awesome bakes and delicious authentic and innovative recipes. We have to share any Gujarati recipe this week.

Earlier posted an easy Tamatari karela or bitter gourd with tomato.

Recipe is very easy to make. I have used peanut but its totally optional. If you don’t like peanut omit it. In Gujarati cuisine jaggery or sugar added to this stir fry. I have used jaggery powder instead of sugar and used only 1 teaspoon. If you like the sweetness, you can add more sugar or jaggery. If you are using jaggery, use grated or powderd jaggery. And if you don’t like the sweet taste skip jaggery or sugar.
Recipe source – Tarla Dalal

Recipe

Karela or bitter gourd – 2 large

Potato – 2 medium

Cashew nuts – 3 tablespoon

Peanut – 3 tablespoon, dry roasted and crushed, optional

Cilantro or coriander leaves – handful, chopped

Salt to taste

Powdered or grated jaggery – 1 – 2 teaspoon or to taste

Cumin seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Hing or asafoetida – 1/4 teaspoon

Turmeric powder – 1/4 teaspoon

Cumin powder – 1 teaspoon

Coriander powder – 1 teaspoon

Red chilli powder – 1/2 teaspoon

Amchur or dry mango powder – 1 teaspoon

Oil – 3 tablespoon

Method

1. Cut off the tips from both ends of bitter gourd or karela. Cut lengthwise, make half. Now cut into thin slices. You can scrap or peel the karela if you don’t like the bitterness at all. Discard the hard seeds.

2. Rinse karela pieces and drain the water. Marinate with 1 teaspoon salt and keep aside for 15 – 30 minutes.

3. Press the karela with your palm and squeeze all the water well. Wash the karela 2 – 3 times again in running water. Squeeze well.

4. Peel and chop the potatoes in small cubes. Rinse and keep aside.

5. Cut the cashew nuts nuts into 4 pieces.

6. Heat oil in a pan.
Add cumin seeds, hing or asafoetida and turmeric powder.

7. When cumin starts to splutter add squeezed karela or bitter gourd in it.
Mix and cover the pan. Cook on low flame for 10 – 12 minutes. Stir in between.

8. Add cubed potatoes and salt. Mix well and cover again. Cook for 10 – 12 minutes again. Keep stirring.

9. When potatoes become tender and karela becomes crisp add broken cashew nuts, chopped cilantro or coriander leaves and dry roasted and crushed peanuts if using. Mix well and cook for 2 – 3 minutes.

10. Now add cumin powder, coriander powder, red chilli powder and amchur or dry mango powder.
Mix well and sate for 2 – 3 minutes.

11. Your karela nu shaak or Gujarati style bitter gourd with cashew nuts is ready. Garnish with cilantro or coriander leaves and serve with roti, paratha or steamed rice.

Notes
1. You can use sugar instead of jaggery.
2. If you don’t like peanut skip it.
3. In Gujarati cuisines jaggery or sugar must be added but if you don’t like the sweetness omit jaggery or sugar.

If you tried my recipe, you can share your food pictures with me in the social network sites by using hash tag, #batterupwithsujata
I would love to see your creations.

I would love to hear from you. Please share your thoughts and suggestions in comment.
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Mochar Chop Or Banana Blossom Croquettes

Mochar chop or banana blossom croquettes. A deep fried delicious snack.
Vitamin and mineral rich banana blossom or flower called mocha in Bengal. Its not only nutritious but also delicious.

Sharing my mother’s recipe today.
I have already shared a traditional Bengali recipe mochar ghono or banana blossom dry curry. Get the recipe here.

The banana tree is the ideal to look up to when it comes to a ‘no wastage’ policy! Almost all parts of the banana tree can be used. The most obvious is the fruit—bananas that we eat almost daily. But, other parts of the tree also offer many health benefits!

Both the South Asians and Southeast Asians use banana flowers as a vegetable. They use it either raw or steamed with dips. They also use those in soups, curries and fried foods. The flavor resembles that of artichoke. Like artichokes, both the fleshy part of the bracts and the heart are edible.
Banana flowers are called banana hearts for a reason! These flowers are pretty, but you should not dismiss them as merely decorative elements. They have a host of health benefits too!

Some of the health benefits of banana flowers are:

Wards Off Infections: …
Reduces Free Radical Activity: …
Reduces Menstrual Bleeding: …
Manages Diabetes And Anemia: …
Rich Source Of Vitamins And Minerals: …
Boosts Mood And Reduces Anxiety: …
Helps Nursing Mothers:
Source

Now here is a delicious deep fried snack banana blossom croquettes or mochar chop.
You have to oil your hands before cleaning and chopping to avoid stain on your hands due to high iron content.

Recipe

Mocha or banana blossom – 1 small

Turmeric powder – 1 teaspoon

Boiled potatoes – 3 large

Green chilli – 2 – 3 chopped

Ginger – 1 inch piece, grated

Mustard oil – 2 teaspoon

Cumin seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Cumin powder – 1 teaspoon

Bhaja moshla or roasted spice powder – 1 & 1/2 teaspoon, get the recipe of bhaja moshla here

Chaat masala powder – 1 teaspoon

Sugar – 1 teaspoon or to taste

Peanut – handful, roasted

Breadcrumb – 2 tablespoon

For batter

Cornflour – 2 tablespoon

Water – 1/3 cup

Breadcrumb and refined flour or maida for coating

Oil for deep fry

Water – 1 & 1/2 cup

Method

1. Get the method of cleansing and chopping banana blossom here

2. Soak the chopped florets in the water with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon turmeric powder overnight.

3. Next day boil the chopped florets in pressure cooker with 1 & 1/2 cup water for 3 – 4 whistle or cook on high flame for 1 whistle then cook on simmer for 10 – 15 minutes.

4. Let it cool down. Drain the water and wash again in running tap water.
Squeeze all the water.

5. Peel and mash or grate the potatoes.

6. Dry roast and peel the peanuts. Break the peanut into half.

7. Heat 2 teaspoon mustard oil in a pan. Add cumin seeds and let them splutter.

8. Add grated ginger and chopped green chili. Fry till the raw smell goes out.

9. Add squeezed banana blossom or mocha. Saute until dried up completely.

10. Add boiled and mashed potatoes salt, sugar, bhaja moshla or dry roasted and ground spices, chaat masala and cumin powder.

11. Mix well and saute till everything mixed nicely.

12. Add dry roasted peanut, mix and remove from heat and let it cool down.

13. In a bowl mix refined flour or maida and water. Mix water gradually and make a lump free batter.

14. In a plate spread breadcrumb and in another plate spread maida or refined flour.

15. Add 2 tablespoon breadcrumb in the banana blossom and potato mixture. Mix well with hand.

16. Make 7 – 8 balls. Make them round patties or give cylindrical shape.

17. Roll them on refined flour or maida then dip into the cornflour batter.

18. Roll on the breadcrumbs.

19. Make all the chop or croquettes like this.

20. Fry immediately or you can keep these in refrigerator and fry later.

21. Heat sufficient oil in a pan or wok.
Fry all the chop or croquettes. Stir gently with a slotted spatula. Fry evenly from all the sides.

22. Remove from oil and place on pepper towel.

Serve hot with kasundi or Bengali mustard sauce, tomato sauce or any sauce.
Enjoy…..

Notes

1. If you want you can add fried sliced onion in the croquettes. Or fry the onion slices with ginger and green chilli.

2. You can add raisins or chopped cashew nuts with peanut.

3. Add green chilli according to your taste. You can increase or decrease the amount of chillies.

4. You can add chopped and fried coconut pieces in the banana blossom potato mixture.

If you tried my recipe, you can share your food pictures with me in the social network sites by using hash tag, #batterupwithsujata
I would love to see your creations.

I would love to hear from you. Please share your thoughts and suggestions in comment.

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Mirchi Ka Salan Or Chilli Curry 

Mirchi ka salan or chilli curry.

A lip-smacking side dish from Andhra cuisine.

The Andhra cuisine comprises of both mouth-watering vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes.

This mirchi ka salan or chilli curry is made of big size less hot variety chillies in a spicy gravy. You can get one more chilli recipe here

Posting this recipe for a Facebook group Shhhhh cooking secretly challenge.

In this group all the participating bloggers were challenged to make a dish with the use of two secret ingredients their partner assigns them with.

This month I have been paired with Shobha Keshwani for Andhra cuisine theme. And the two ingredients are mirchi/chilli and til/sesame.

Shobha is a very talented blogger who blog at http://www.shobhasfoodmazaa.com/?m=1

Check out delicious recipes on her blog. Thanks a lot Shobha for the advice and these wonderful ingredients.

I am very happy to share this because its first recipe from Andhra cuisine in my blog.
Mirchi ka salan generally served with Haydrabadi biryani. I have made veg pulao with this delicious curry. I will share this veg pulao recipe later.

I have made this mirchi ka salan according to my taste. Added little sugar and a small tomato in it. But you can omit sugar and tomato if you like. Tomato and red chilli powder gives a nice colour to the gravy.



Recipe 


Big size green chilli – 6-8

Onion – 1

Garlic – 3 cloves

Ginger – 1/2 inch piece

Peanut – 1/4 cup

Desiccated coconut – 1/4 cup

Seasam seed – 1 heaped tablespoon

Tomato – 1 small, chopped

Cumin seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Nigella seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Mustard seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Salt to taste

Red chilli powder – 1 teaspoon

Garam masala powder – 1/4 teaspoon

Tamarind – 1 tablespoon

Sugar – 1/4 teaspoon

Oil – 3 – 4 tablespoon



Method 
Soak the tamarind in 1/4 cup hot water.

Wash the chillies. Pat dry and remove the stem. Slit vertically and remove the seeds. Chillies should be intact. Don’t cut fully. Keep aside.

Dry roast the peanut and let it cool. Peel and grind in a grinder.

Dry roast sesame seeds and dessicated coconut separately till becomes light brown.

Heat 2 tablespoon oil in a pan. Fry sliced onion. When the onion becomes translucent add chopped garlic. Fry till the onion becomes brown.

Add tomato and ginger. Saute till the tomato becomes mushy and oil leaves the sides.

Add ground peanut, sesame seeds and dessicated coconut. Saute for 1 minute.

Let the mixture cool down. Grind the mixture with turmeric powder, red chilli powder and garam masala powder. I have used kashmiri red chilli powder, its not hot but if you are using red chilli powder add as per your spice tolerance.

Make a smooth paste.

Heat remaining oil in a pan. Fry the chillies till light brown. Cover the pan while frying to avoid spluttering.

When the chillies changes it’s colour, remove from oil and place on a paper towel.

In the same oil add cumin seeds, mustard seeds and nigella seeds. Let them splutter. Add curry leaves. Now add the ground spices and saute for 1-2 minutes.

Add water, salt, sugar and tamarind pulp. Add water as require to make a thick curry.

When it starts to rolling boil add fried chillies. Stir and cover. Cook on low heat for 10 – 15 minutes. Check in between.

Remove the cover. Taste and adjust the salt. The gravy should be thick. If its runny boil for some more time or add more water if require.

Garnish with chopped cilantro and tomato.

Serve hot with biryani, pulao, jeera rice or any bread, paratha or naan.
I would love to hear from you. Please share your thoughts and suggestions in comment.

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Peanut Potatoes / Fasting recipe 

Peanut potatoes or potatoes for fasting days.

Shravan is considered an auspicious month for the Hindus. Many people observe fast on every Monday during this month. Fast to learn self-control and detoxify the body. So fasting is not to torture ourselves. A proper diet is important to keep ourselves healthy and energetic.

Generally people eat potatoes, sabudana/sago or tapioca, buckwheat flour or kuttu atta, water chestnut flour or singhara atta, barnyard millet or vrat ka chawal/sama rice, fried food, sweets etc.

I have shared some more fasting recipes here.

Water chestnut and coconut cake

Barnyard millet fried idli 

Potato and barnyard millet cutlets

Singhara atta or water chestnut laddu

I am sharing a simple potato recipe today. Simple and easy yet lip-smacking taste.



Recipe 


Boiled potatoes – 8-10 small

Roasted or fried peanut – 1/4 cup

Clarified butter or ghee – 2 tablespoon

Cumin seeds – 1 teaspoon

Rai or black mustard seeds – 1/2 teaspoon

Curry leaves – 10-15

Asafetida or hing – a pinch

Grated ginger – 1-2 teaspoon

Chopped green chilli – 2-3 chopped

Black pepper powder – 1 teaspoon or to taste

Cumin powder – 1 teaspoon

Rock salt or sendha namak to taste

Lemon juice – 1 tablespoon

Chopped cilantro 2 tablespoon, optional



Method 


Peel the boiled potatoes. Make half. If potatoes are too small use whole.

Heat ghee or clarified butter in a pan. Add cumin seeds and mustard seeds. Let them splutter.

Add curry leaves, asafoetida, chopped green chilli and grated ginger. You can add 1-2 dry red chilli with these.

Fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the potatoes, rock salt, cumin powder,  black pepper powder. Fry till the potatoes becomes light brown.

Add fried or roasted peanut. If you like also add some fried cashew nuts.

You can use crushed peanut too.

Mix well. Saute for 1-2 minutes more.

Add lemon juice and mix well.

Remove from heat. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Add more rock salt and lemon juice if require.

Garnish with chopped cilantro and lemon wedges. If you have fresh grated coconut spread over it.

Serve hot.

Note –

You can use fried cashew nuts instead of peanuts, or use both. Add a fistful grated fresh coconut to make it more yummy.

You can use oil instead of ghee or clarified butter.

If you are not making it for fasting then add 1-2 teaspoon chaat masala too.

In place of lemon juice you can use dry mango powder or amchur or anardana powder/dry pomegranate powder.

If you want it hot add 1 teaspoon red chilli powder in it.

I would love to hear from you. Please share your thoughts and suggestions in comment.

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Potato And Barnyard Millet Cutlets 

Pan fried cutlet with potato and barnyard millet. 

Today is fourth day of Navaratri. Goddess Durga took nine forms to kill Mahishasura, the demon. Each form has its own significance.

Devi Kushmanda, the fourth Avatar of Goddess Durga, is worhipped on the fourth Avatar day of Navratri.

According to popular belief, Devi Kushmanda is reflected in every living and non-living entity of this universe. She is the source of energy, which gives her devotees the ability to make decisions intellectually.She is there to show the right way in life and to overcome all sorrows and pain and fill life with happiness and joy.

Many devotees observing fast these days. Sharing a yummy recipe for fasting people. I have made it for my friend who is on 9 days fast. Pan fried cutlets. Feasting people like us can  enjoy it too  😀

I have made it with potato, Shama ka chawal or Barnyard millet. Its also known as Swang ke chawal or Mordhan. Its looks like small rice but actually its not rice. It is from millet family. A gluten free grain, can be consumed on fasting. 

Recipe 


Potatoes – 8 boiled 

Barnyard millet or Swang ke chawal – 1 cup

Tapioca sago or Sabudana – 1/2 cup 

Roasted peanuts – 1/4 cup 

Rock salt to taste 

Ginger – 1 inch piece grated
Green chilli – 2-3 finely chopped 

Coriander leaves – handful chopped 

Black pepper powder – 1 teaspoon 

Cumin powder – 1 teaspoon

Roasted spices powder – 1-2 teaspoon 

Dry mango powder or amchur – 2 teaspoon 

Method 


Peel and mash the boiled potatoes. Soak the tapioca sago. 

Wash the Shama ke chawal or barnyard millet and cook in a pressure cooker with 2 cup of water for 3 whistle. Let it cool. 

In a large bowl mix mashed potatoes, boiled barnyard millet, soaked and drained  tapioca sago, roasted peanuts, salt, chopped coriander leaves, green chilli and all the spices. You can use 1 teaspoon red chilli powder too if you like. 

For roasted spices dry roast 2 tablespoon cumin seeds, 2 tablespoon coriander seeds and 6-7 dry red chilli. After roasting let it cool and grind. Add 1 teaspoon mix everything well taste and add more if require. Its depends on your spice tolerance. 

Mix well. Make round patties with the mixture. I have made big size 12 patties but you can make it small too. 

Shallow fry the parties in little ghee/clarified butter or or oil. Fry both the sides. Serve with coriander peanut chutney. 

For chutney 


Chopped coriander leaves – 1 cup tightly packed 

Roasted and peeled peanut – 1/2 cup 

Green chilli – 2-3

Lemon – 2

Tomatoes – 2 large 

Ginger – 1/2 inch piece 

Rock salt or srndha namak to taste 
Method 


Grind the roasted and peeled peanuts. With this peanut powder add chopped coriander leaves, chopped ginger, chopped tomatoes and green chilli. Make a smooth paste. You can add more green chilli if you like it hot. 
Add rock salt, juice of 2 lemons, cumin powder and mix well. Taste and adjust the seasoning. 

You can keep this chutney in refrigerator for 3-4 days. 

Enjoy your fasting food with this hot tangy chutney. 

Happy Navaratri. Happy Fasting or Feasting 🙂